Archive for the 'Janelle Finnerty' Category

Final Application

March 13, 2011

For the final application I plan on making a 3D interactive information graphic revolving around the last 10 years of tuition increases. Being a soon to be college graduate I will have to deal with the immense amounts of loans that I had to take out in order to pay for this now ‘required’ education. How long will it take to pay back? Was it worth it? In the last 10 years Western alone has increased tuition by 100.2% and the national average has increased by 101.9%. Through an information graphic such as this awareness could be risen about the increasing cost of a ‘required’ education.

http://www.collegeboard.com/prod_downloads/press/cost06/trends_college_pricing_06.pdf

http://www.pcsum.org/reportsandstudies/pcsumreportsandstudies/tuitionandfeesreports/

3D Infographic

February 20, 2011

Study 1 Graphic

February 16, 2011

Study 1 Round 2

February 11, 2011

Study 1 Overview: So I have never created an information graphic before so the initial study was to simply create a flat print information graphic using readily available information (my abnormal day). The information displayed is a map of where I traveled that day, when I traveled there, how long it took me, how much I accomplished and how much I enjoyed the activity.

Study 1 Overview: So I have never created an information graphic before so the initial study was to simply create a flat print information graphic using readily available information. The information was my abnormal day and what occurred in the house, outside of it, and how interesting I found each of the activities. I will be using this base of information for the next two studies but will create different visuals for each one.

Study Ideas

February 8, 2011

UPDATED: FEBRUARY 11, 2011

Study 1: Create a 2D print based information graphic using information about my abnormal day.

Objective: learn how to make a successful information graphic and make it informative. If time allows see how scale can affect the effectiveness of the graphic utilizing projection.

Study 2: Create a 3D information graphic based on the information used from the previous study to compare how the formats can change, what 3D is limited to and what is gained by using 3D.

Objective: learn how to create interactivity through a tangible study allowing viewers to explore the information at their own pace.

Study 3: Create a digital information graphic that utilizes a simple button system allowing viewers to interact at their own pace and reveal information as they want. Use the information from the previous two studies to see how the information can change between mediums.

Objective: learn how to create a digital interactive piece while learning the limitations and the new options that the medium creates (such as sound).

Study 1: Create print based information graphic using the schedule of an abnormal day. Utilize both color and texture in the creation of the information graphic to show where and how long each activity took place.

Study 2: Using the same information from study 1 create an interactive motion based piece that allows viewers to pick and choose what they want to see. Compare and contrast the allowances of both mediums and see which medium works better with different elements.

Study 3: Plan to investigate some form of tangible design to have people choose what they view and when. The approach will be through either a 3D model or printed foldable or collapsible medium.

Janelle Finnerty

December 11, 2010

UPDATED:

FEBRUARY 10, 2011

FEBRUARY 01, 2011

JANUARY 26, 2011

Interactive Information Graphics

OBSERVATIONS

Richard Saul Wurman* said that people only remember information that they are interested in or if the information is a concept you can grasp. A new way to create interest is by allowing the viewer to choose what they see, and allowing them to navigate and interact with that information, thus introducing the interactive infographic. Interactive infographics can be many things, including environmental design, digital design, or print design that allows the viewer to choose when and how they view information. Showing information in different ways through interactivity can close the gap on how people interpret this information, allowing better retention and understanding of large statistics.

Common places that utilize digital interactive pieces are museums, science centers, and cultural centers. One example of a digital interactive piece is at the Detroit Institute of Arts. In 2008 the DIA was awarded for Lisa Strausfeld’s* interactive exhibits creation. Strausfeld and her team created videos, table settings, and interactive books. This interactivity allows the viewers to see the material at their own pace helping to increase interest and understanding. Especially in the interactive books, which some that were chosen to digitize were so small that the digital renderings now allow visitors to actually witness what is inside.

One example of an interactive environmental infographic is Massive Change directed by designer Bruce Mau*. The information about this exhibit was gathered from online (http://www.massivechange.com/).  Massive Change was an exhibition that ran from September 16th – December 31st of 2006. Following the exhibition several side exhibits were displayed and a book was published about the exhibits ideals. Massive Change immerses visitors in an environment meant to cause questioning about the future of design and the decisions we must make as designers. The gallery spaces force the viewers into information causing them to interact and absorb it. The exhibit utilized video, print, 3D, and environment design in order to create an impressionable impact upon viewers. Interactive infographics such as these are rare, and hard to come by. They are not going to go away though, and need to be used in many different spectrums from educational purposes to social, political or economical spectrums to help people retain, understand, and care about that information.

THESIS

By showing information in different ways through interactivity we can close the gap on how people interpret information, allowing better retention and understanding of large statistics.

TERMS

Data: individual facts, statistics, or items of information.

Environmental Graphic Design (EGD): a design profession embracing many design disciplines including graphic design, architecture, industrial design and landscape architecture. Practitioners in this field are concerned with the visual aspects of way finding, communicating identity and brands, information design, and shaping a sense of a location.

Fever Chart: a chart connecting points on a graph to show changing quantities over time; also called a line chart.

Graph: a diagram representing a system of connections or interrelations among two or more things by a number of distinctive dots, lines, bars, ect.

Information Anxiety: produced by the ever-widening gap between what we understand and what we think we should understand.

Information Architecture: the art of expressing a model or concept of information used in activities that require explicit details of complex systems.

Information Graphic (Infographic): visual representations of information, data, or knowledge. These graphics present complex information quickly and clearly.

Interactive: allowing or relating to continuous two-way transfer of information between a user and the central point of a communication system.

Interface: a surface regarded as the common boundary of two bodies, spaces, or phases.

Pie Chart: a circular chart divided into triangular areas proportional to the percentages of the whole.

Retention: the act or power of remembering things; memory.

Statistic: a numerical fact or datum, usually computed from a sample.

DESIGNERS

Charles (1907 – 1978) & Ray (1912 – 1988) Eames: were two American designers who made contributions to modern architecture, furniture, graphic design, fine art, and film. The film that pertains to my thesis is The Power of Ten, a video that visualizes distances into space and into an atom. It helps to visualize how information can be described in a way people can understand it.

Bruce Mau: designer currently operating out of his studio, which he founded in 1985, in Toronto, Canada. He is widely known for his many publications, manifesto, and the exhibition Massive Change. As a designer he has created work for Coca-cola, MTV, and McDonald’s. He also created the Institute without Boundaries, which is a postgraduate studio based school. For my thesis I am interested in his Massive Change project in particular, which is a dramatic statement about the condition of our world. There is utility of information graphics, which creates a great example of how interactive information graphics can change our world. This is the only show that I was able to find that utilized information that addressed current social issues.

Anton Stankowski (1906 – 1998): a German graphic designer, painter, and photographer. He was well known for his designs attempting to illustrate processes or behaviors rather than objects.

Lisa Strausfeld: a current graphic design partner of Pentagram. She is well known for her work in environmental and informational graphics, and teaches interactive site-specific design at Yale School of Art. In 1996 she founded Perspecta, a software company that specialized in the organization of large information collections. She became a partner of Pentagram in 2002, where she specialized in intermingling the digital with the physical plane. Amongst many things she works on websites, interactive displays, and large-scale media instillations. She was named Businessweek’s “Cutting Edge Designer” in 2007. In 2010 she received the National Design Award for Interactive Design and has received several recognitions and other awards in the last three years.

Edward Tufte: born in 1942 Tufte is an American Professor Emeritus at Yale University. He is most known for his work in information design, statistical evidence, and interface design. Tufte has written several books about the presentation of information. He has held fellowships at the Guggenheim Foundation as well as the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences.

Richard Saul Wurman: born in 1935 Wurman is an architect and graphic designer who is a pioneer in making information easily understandable. He has written over 80 books in his career including Information Anxiety and Information Architects, both of which are now coined terms. A lot of information was drawn from his Information Anxiety 1 and 2 books. Some key elements drawn were supporting information about the challenge of people being able to comprehend large numbers, as well as ways to organize information and make it more comprehensible.

CASE STUDIES

CASE 1

Title: Massive Change

Created by: Bruce Mau Design and the Institute without Boundaries

Massive Change is “not about the world of design. It’s about the design of the world.” It was a statement about how people are reshaping the world to make it better. There were eleven areas that touched on several subjects including transportation, urban design, and information design.

CASE 2

Title: Detroit Institute of Arts Interactive Renovation

Created by: Lisa Strausfeld (Pentagram)

The Detroit Institute of Arts aimed to create several new engaging, digital, interactive sites around the museum for visitors. The pieces include African dances, interactive books, several videos, and an entire video about the Art of Dining.

CASE 3

Title: CFO Outlook Survey

Created by: Lisa Strausfeld (Pentagram)

An interactive Flash infographic that shows a survey of over 530 CEO’s of companies across several industries about their views of the U.S. economy. The viewer can choose what industry they wish to see, as well as seeing the average answers at all times. Each industry is color-coded making it easy to read, and the questions span over many subjects.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bhaskaran, Lakshmi. Size Matters. Switzerland: RotoVision, 2004.

Hiebert, Kenneth J. Graphic Design Sources. Yale University, 1998.

Wilson, David H. Signage Systems & Information Graphics. USA: Thames & Hudson Inc., 2007.

Wurman, Richard Saul. Information Anxiety. New York: Doubleday, 1989.

Wurman, Richard Saul. Information Architects. Zurich, Switzerland: Graphis Press Corp., 1996.

READING LOG

WEEKS 1-3

Mau, Bruce and The Institute without Boundaries. Massive Change. New York: Phaidon Press Inc., 2004 (Book)

Stankowski, Anton. Visual Presentation of Invisible Processes. Switzerland: Arthur Niggli Ltd. (Book)

Wurman, Richard Saul. Cities: Comparisons of Form and Scale. (Book)

Veronique, Greenwood. “Getting Past the Pie Chart.” Seed Magazine, February 2009, 31-32. (Magazine Article)

Veronique, Greenwood. “Connecting Distant Dots.” Seed Magazine, February 2009, 56-57. (Magazine Article)

Veronique, Greenwood. “What We Lose.” Seed Magazine, February 2009, 118-119. (Magazine Article)

Eames, Charles and Ray. Powers of 10. (Video)

<http://www.powersof10.com/&gt;

Jeremijenko, Natalie. “Environmental Design.” (Video)

<http://seedmagazine.com/designseries/natalie-jeremijenko.html>

Strausfeld, Lisa. “The Space of Information.” (Video)

<http://seedmagazine.com/designseries/lisa-strausfeld.html&gt;

WEEK 4

McCandless,David. The Visual Miscellaneum. UK: Butler Tanner and Dennis, 2009. (Book)

Tufte, Edward R. Envisioning Information. Cheshire, Connecticut: Graphics Press, 1990. (Book: Chapter 2)

Wurman,Richard Saul. Information Anxiety 2. Indianapolis, Indiana: Que, 2001. (Book: Chapters 1-3)

WEEK 5

Hughes, Bradley R. “Transparency: Paying the Same Amount for Smaller Products, GOOD Magazine“. (2011),  <http://www.good.is/post/transparency-paying-the-same-amount-for-smaller-products/&gt;. (accessed February 10, 2011). (Online Article/Infographic)

“Overfishing: A Global Disaster.” 2007 – 2011. <http://overfishing.org/&gt; (accessed February 9, 2011). (Online Data Source)

Smith, Peter. “Feast Your Eyes: The United States Is No Longer the Fattest Country, GOOD Magazine“. <http://www.good.is/post/chart-the-united-states-is-no-longer-the-fattest-country/&gt;. (accessed February 9, 2011). (Online Article/Infographic)

Wurman,Richard Saul. Information Anxiety 2. USA: 2001. (Book: Chapter 15)


JANUARY 15, 2011

Proposal 1: Does Green Design have to be Green?

During the semester of Fall 2010 I was asked to design a brand for a ‘green’ company. The question that came to mind after researching and then creating the forms for the company was, “does the logo and other forms representing the company have to be the color green?” Through previous research I knew that green is currently a very popular color and appears everywhere. It is so prominent I have begun to find it obnoxious to look at and somewhat over powering. This made me look deeper to find products, companies, and other organizations that represented themselves as being ‘green’ without using the color green. I found that about 1 in 10 companies go this route, but I tend to appreciate their choices more.

I intend to debunk the idea that green design has to be green. Green has many different psychological meanings including being: calm, quiet, springy, gaudy, trendy, refreshing, soothing, and neutral. There is no reason why other colors in the spectrum cannot encompass all these things. The idea of the absence of color comes to mind as well by creating forms that are made of natural materials instead of being a color. Through a series of studies I intend to compare and contrast green designs by using the color green versus other colors and materials to see if the same or better feeling of ‘green’ comes to mind. The designs that may be investigated through are packaging, book layouts, interior design, business systems, ect.

Case Studies:

Method

http://www.methodhome.com/

Twenty Twenty One

http://www.twentytwentyone.com/displayProduct.asp?ProductID=1139&x=58510

Orangecup Natural Frozen Yogurt

http://www.myorangecup.com/

Blue

http://move2blue.com/

Waku Waku

http://www.waku-waku.eu/

Bibliography:

Benson, Eric. The Big Book of Green Design. Suzanna & Anthony Stephens. New York: Collins Design, 2009.

Drew, John T. Color Management: A Comprehensive Guide for Graphic Designers. Switzerland: RotoVision, 2005.

Eiseman, Leatrice. Pantone Guide to Communicating with Color. Sarasota, Florida: Grafix Press, Ltd., 2000.


Proposal 2: How to Comprehend Large Statistics Through Large Informational Graphics

On average we eat 600.5 lbs of dairy products, not including cheese, a year. During the Holocaust anywhere between 11 to 17 million died. There are 13 million users of Call of Duty in the year 2009 alone. What do all these statistics have in common? They are all large numbers that sound incredibly impressive, but are difficult to visualize. I have read (although I can’t remember where) that people will mourn the death of a single individual more so than the death of a mass number, because they can relate to a single person more so than the masses. I personally have contended with this problem as well. Even though the numbers are large I cannot visualize what 600.5 lbs looks like, or what 11 million people looks like even though the numbers are catastrophically large.

I intend to investigate how informational graphics can be used through a combination of print, digital, 3D, and environmental design to help people comprehend all these immense statistics. I want to investigate the American food industry and the negative impact our eating habits have created. I personally feel that the subject does not get enough justice causing little concern for where our food comes from as long as it is cheap. The driving element to go on this direction was the movie Food Inc., of which I will watch again in order to translate statistics and general information from.

Case Studies:

Massive Change

http://www.massivechange.com/

Veins of Life

http://veinsoflife.info/

Ralph Appelbaum pg. 153

Bibliography:

Wilson, David H. Signage Systems & Information Graphics. USA: Thames & Hudson Inc., 2007.

Wurman, Richard Saul. Information Anxiety. New York: Doubleday, 1989.

Wurman, Richard Saul. Information Architects. Zurich, Switzerland: Graphis Press Corp., 1996.

Examples:

http://datavisualization.ch/showcases/lovely-animated-3d-infographics

 

Proposal 3: Web Site Design and Navigation

Websites have become one of the most important communicative tools that people and designers alike can utilize. Yet the organization and design of some necessary websites, such as those for the state (http://www.wisconsin.gov/), public universities (http://www.memphis.edu/), or areas of public interest (http://www.orion.lib.mi.us/) are seemingly forgotten about, making them difficult to navigate and easily forgettable. I have found some websites that address both problems by making a standardized system that changes per department or change in information. This treatment of websites reminds me of a book and makes me wonder why a website, which contains mass information, could not read like a book that an individual can navigate quickly and easily.

I propose to utilize an understanding of hierarchy, grids, site maps, color, and visual systems in order to create a website that successfully captures the essence of the chosen company/organization while making mass information more navigable. The information will be divided by chapters/sections and each section will be coordinated to that information. The overall visual system of the website will not change allowing for a constant to connect the whole website together.

Case Studies:

Eye Magazine

http://www.eyemagazine.com/home.php

National Geographic

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/

I Love NY

http://www.iloveny.com/

Bibliography:

Bhaskaran, Lakshmi. Size Matters. Switzerland: RotoVision, 2004.

 

Wurman, Richard Saul. Information Architects. Zurich, Switzerland: Graphis Press Corp., 1996.


JANUARY 14, 2011

Proposal 1: Web Site Design and Navigation

Websites have become one of the most important communicative tools that people and designers alike can utilize. Yet the organization and design of some necessary websites, such as those for the state (http://www.wisconsin.gov/), public universities (http://www.memphis.edu/), or areas of public interest (http://www.orion.lib.mi.us/) are seemingly forgotten about, making them difficult to navigate and easily forgettable. I propose to utilize an understanding of hierarchy, grids, site maps, and other design tools in order to create a website that successfully captures the essence of the chosen company/organization while making mass information easily able to navigate.

Proposal 2: Information Graphics, Motion and Print

Informational graphics are everywhere, but sometimes pose the problem of looking alike (ex. pie charts, line charts, ect.), being uninteresting, or confusing. I propose that informational graphics that combine both print media and motion digital media can have a stronger impact and create better understanding than the two living separately. Print creates a sense of stability, can be easily carried around, or can be large to create impact; it is traveled at the speed of the viewer. While digital motion based media guides the viewer through the information and shows what to focus on, can be fast paced driven and contain effects that print cannot include, such as sound.

Proposal 3: Does Green Design have to be Green?

With the growing expanse of International design it has become important for designers to understand different cultures perceptions. One example is the use of color. I find it interesting the large variety of perceptions over a single color. For example the color red in America can mean aggression, stop, or passion, in India purity, and in China good luck or celebration.  I propose to choose a single design and through the use of only color to keep the meaning of the design the same throughout the international spectrum.