Archive for the 'David Daniele' Category

David Daniele

December 11, 2010

1/28/11

Verus Pro Bono

Observations

It is common practice these days for people to use the term pro bono as a way to describe work that they are doing for a client in which they do not charge for the work. And often times the clients are non-profits, and charities, and most other times they are doing the work because the designers were told it “would be good experience”, or “good for your portfolio.” Although these cases are generally more common to younger, under-experienced designers. But it the term itself which is being used incorrectly. To do something that is pro bono, in its true sense, would be to create a piece or body of work that can benefit the public as a whole. Whether it be to inform them of an upcoming election in a non-partisan way (AIGA Get Out the Vote poster campaign) or to early american rural homes that electricity, running water, and telephone lines were on the way to enrich their lives (Lester Beall WPA posters).

One connection that seems to be lacking in the united states is the sheer volume of public good pieces that are produced, which is very low considering Amsterdam, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and other such European countries. One might argue that this is because the design literacy rate is far lower and in the states, and has a lower importance on public social and political issues. I am arguing however, that with more (well designed, and carefully considered) Public good pieces, the design literacy rate and appreciation can be higher. And with that change design can influence the politics, city planning, and social awareness of our country.

Thesis:

I intend to reposition the concept of pro bono design work.

Design for public good by enhancing the human experience through design thinking and problem solving.

Define specific terms

Pro bono is short for the Latin Phrase, “pro bono publico”, which translates to “for the public good”. It is often referred in the design profession as work which is done free of charge. This is one distinction that I want to make in my arguments, that pro bono work is not merely work that is free, but work that is done for free (without profit) in order to benefit the public good by enhancing the human experience through design and problem solving.

First Things First Manifesto 1946 – “We think that there are other things more worth using our skill and experience on. There are signs for streets and buildings, books and periodicals, catalogues, instructional manuals, industrial photography, educational aids, films, television features, scientific and industrial publications and all the other media through which we promote our trade, our education, our culture and our greater awareness of the world.”

First Things First Manifesto 2000 – There are pursuits more worthy of our problem-solving skills. Unprecedented environmental, social and cultural crises demand our attention. Many cultural interventions, social marketing campaigns, books, magazines, exhibitions, educational tools, television programs, films, charitable causes and other information design projects urgently require our expertise and help.

The AIGA defines pro bono work as: volunteer work done “for the public good”.

Visual precedents/case studies, 3 contrasting projects

that support your research direction

In the early days of american traditions in graphic design, Lester Beall was contracted by the government to make posters that would make it out to a target audience of rural areas with the objective to inform the people there that running water, working electricity, and telephone lines were available to them through the Rural Electrification Administration. Beall was setting precedents to how graphic design can serve the public good and enhance peoples lives through communication.


In 2008 (as well as 2004 and 2000), The AIGA administrated a “Get Out The Vote” campaign which encouraged designers around the country to create non-partisan posters about the upcoming election, reminding registered voters that they have the ability to voice their opinions. This poster campaign was aided through the network of the internet, where those who were interested in other designs could download others’ files, print them, and post them where they saw fit. The hope was to increase interest and awareness of the upcoming election.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amsterdam, Netherlands; a design firm named DEPT. was commissioned by a private client to create a weekly recurring project that was related to design and design awareness, as well as public awareness. DEPT.’s outcome was that of plastic bags that had an alternating design on them from week to week, inspired by a news story that was relevant to that week. People could find these bags at news stands, coffee shops, etc. They would use them to carry things that they needed to, but were also quite helpful in combatting the common soggy bike seats (using the bags to cover their seats while being stored outside), due to incessant rainy weather in Amsterdam. This project not only was helpful by its physical manifestation to the people of amsterdam, but the timely messages on the bag reminded the people that there was more going on around outside of themselves.

Bibliography

Lester Beall website

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pro_bono

http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/position-spec-work?searchtext=pro%20bono

http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/gotv-2008-wrap-up?searchtext=get%20out%20the%20vote

Reading Log

Introduction to A Designers Art by Paul Rand

Design in Michigan by Katherine McCoy

Do Normal, Current Dutch Design

Introduction to Graphic Agitation

Social Design in Three Dimensions: Four Examples-
http://changeobserver.designobserver.com/entry.html?entry=24398

Mensch at Work
http://changeobserver.designobserver.com/entry.html?entry=24448

Where Is the (Brotherly) Love?
http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/where-is-the-brotherly-love?searchtext=pro%20bono

Gorilla Video
http://www.artbabble.org/video/boijmans/graphic-design-collective-gorilla-daily-visual-column

Gorilla website
http://www.thedailygorilla.nl/

Beyond Pro Bono – Graphic Design’s Social Work
Anne Bush, Citizen Designer

Social Design Thrives in Baltimore
http://www.core77.com/blog/featured_items/case_study_social_design_thrives_in_baltimore_by_andrew_shea_18261.asp

I <3 New York More Than Ever
Steven Heller interviews Milton Glaser, Citizen Designer

1/24/11
Ranked

Proposal 1

I am interested in design which purpose is to make people aware of certain social and political issues. The scope of my interest however is not specific to descent of any particular issue at all, but the mere idea of using design as a vehicle to enhance the human experience. For the public good. In other words pro bono. Pro bono is short for a latin phrase, “pro bono publico” which translates to “for the public good”. My intent is to explore the merits of pro bono design, how it is implemented in our culture, and how it can increase the rate of design literacy amongst Americans.

Proposal 2

I would like to explore the integration of graphic design into architecture. Several examples of this fusion include, signage, way-finding, and decorative elements. One example is the design on the front of the New York Times building in New York by Michael Beirut, specifically how he used the construction of the building to determine the way in which the type is read. I want to experiment with the angles and proportions of architecture in relationship with graphics to enhance the experience and vocabulary of a specific building.

Proposal 3

I am interested in the new roles of the consumer in the branding process. Recently because of the advancements of online communities and the popularity of blogging, the forum for design related discourse has expanded quite vastly. And because of this we are seeing some companies who have chosen to rebrand their image rejected, ridiculed and sampled by the online critique group. In some cases, the backlash was enough for the companies to revert to their older more successful logos.

1/18/11

Proposal 1

I am interested in the new roles of the consumer in the branding process. Recently because of the advancements of online communities and the popularity of blogging, the forum for design related discourse has expanded quite vastly. And because of this we are seeing some companies who have chosen to rebrand their image rejected, ridiculed and sampled by the online critique group. In some cases, the backlash was enough for the companies to revert to their older more successful logos.

Proposal 2

I am interested in the amount of appreciation and importance that design holds in nations like, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, etc. I would like to explore some ways of educating citizens in America the role that design can play in enhancing the human experience. Design literacy is one way to push this issue to the front of peoples minds. Telling people what to look for, or what is considered good design rather than just “good enough”.


Proposal 3

I would like to explore the integration of graphic design into architecture. Several examples of this fusion include, signage, way-finding, and decorative elements. One example is the design on the front of the New York Times building in New York by Michael Beirut, specifically how he used the construction of the building to determine the way in which the type is read. I want to experiment with the angles and proportions of architecture in relationship with graphics to enhance the experience and vocabulary of a specific building.

11/30/2010

Proposal 1

I am interested in Branding for companies and organizations on a global scale. Specifically it interests me to hear some of the failures, or short sightedness of those who push their brands into the global arena. An example is when Chevrolet attempted to market their car, the Nova, to Spanish speaking countries they neglected to check that the word “nova” translates to “doesn’t go” in Spanish. Needless to say the car was a complete flop and was pulled from Spanish speaking markets. Another example of this folly is that the American Red Cross, the combination of their color choice and symbol communicates death or illness in some cultures. This is quite the opposite of what the Red Cross is trying to say with their imagery. This type of consideration must be made if a company or organization is to communicate their message outside of their native country the way they want to. Without such consideration we will see the mistakes made by Chevrolet and the American Red Cross repeat themselves in other forms.

Proposal 2

I am interested in the current job market for recent college graduates. Currently there is a high percentage of young people who have graduated from a four-year institution but are not working in their field of study. This topic is of a particular interest to me because I have been exploring the imagery of this very issue in my elective art studio classes. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the percentage of unemployed people with a college degree or higher is at the lowest it’s been since the bureau started tracking such data in 1970.

Proposal 3

I am interested in interactive environment design. I would like to explore how an empty room can be transformed into an environment that conveys mood, feeling, or an informative message. My interest first peaked in my freshmen year at the Frostic School of Art where a group of graphic design seniors put on a show for an open house that involved the first floor art history space. They completely transformed the original layout of the room into something that was completely immersive, intriguing and full of wonder. I can see the benefits in this way of communicating a message or feeling to an audience due its completely engaging nature.